Archive for July, 2013

Animals crossing a stream

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Wonderful trap video by FAPAS of boars, a wolf and a bear crossing a stream somewhere in Asturias. 1 minute, 30 seconds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZpMNbMdSjAQ

Bear in camera trap

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Fantastic photo taken by a camera trap somewhere in Asturias by the wildlife group FAPAS. There are now some 180 brown bears in the Cantabrian mountains (Cantabria, Castilla y León and above all Asturias), triple the figure 20 years ago.

Tiger mosquitoes in Barcelona

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

tiger mosquito hostsInteresting chart comparing the dining preferences in Barcelona of native mosquitoes with the dreaded Tiger Mosquito, an invasive species from Southeast Asia. While the former’s victims are: 35.7% humans, 21.4% cats, 14.3% dogs, 8.5% Turkish dove and 19.1 % other birds (pigeons, parakeets and blackbirds, sparrows etc), the Tiger Mosquito feeds EXCLUSIVELY on humans, which it bites during the day. My own resistance has built up remarkably over the last eight years since they arrived, and although their bite is still a burning one, the swelling now goes down after about 30 minutes

Iberian Lynx in 2013

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Some good news from Spain for a change: the remarkable success of the Iberian lynx conservation programme so far, which has seen the lynx’s population triple to some 312 individuals in Andalucia since 2002.

I would say the importance of its success goes beyond Spain: if Europe had been incapable of preventing the extinction of a major predator (and a completely harmless one to humans), how could it then go on to preach wildlife conservation under far more difficult circumstances to developing countries?

The image shows an Iberian lynx born in captivity taking its first step into the wild in Despeñaperros natural park,

More in El País here and good summary here by Stephen Burgen in The Guardian.

 

Raccoons in Madrid

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

The Madrid goverment is to attempt to eradicate the region’s 300-strong population of raccoons, which has mushroomed from a small number of escaped or released unwanted pets. More in El País here.