Portugal

Articles in ‘Portugal’

Iberian lynx news 2016

December 14th, 2016

A short summary of some news about the Iberian lynx in 2016:

On the postive side:

176 Iberian lynx have been released into the wild since 2009.

40 more will be released in different areas of Andalucia, Extremadura and Portugal in 2017. Specifically these areas are:

  • Portugal: Vale do Guadiana, Mértola
  • Spain : Valle de Matachel, Badajoz; Montes de Toledo, Toledo; Sierra Morena Oriental, Ciudad Real; Guadalmellato, Córdoba and Guarrizas, Jaén. More here

19 Iberian lynx cubs were born in 2016 in the subpopulation of Castilla-La Mancha. More here

48 cubs were born in captivity in 2016. Here

More worryingly:

13 lynxes have been killed on roads so far in 2016

Iberian lynx has the lowest known genetic variety in any mammal. Here

Iberian lynx stamps

December 10th, 2016

Iberian lynx stamps and first day cover from Portugal. The bottom one also has a stamp with its favourite prey; the rabbit

Latest lynx news

December 4th, 2009

The transfer of captive Iberian lynx from Spain to Portgual has been completed with the arrival of two males, bringing to a total of 16 animals (11 males and 5 females) at the new breeding centre in Silves in the Algarve.

According to the latest figures from the Andalucian government, there are now some 223 lynxes in the wild in Andalucia, 63 in Doñana and 160 in the Sierra Morena. This is remarkable increase from the low point of an estimated 120 animals in 2004 (42 in Doñana and 78 in Sierra Morena). This year 21 cubs were raised in Doñaña with a total of 16 female territories. As far I know, these total figures do not include the 15 odd animals recently discovered in Castilla-La Mancha.

As for the recent deaths of two female lynxes, it seems that a violent death has been ruled out in both cases. El País

Lynx back in Portugal

October 28th, 2009

As reported previously by iberianature, The first Iberian lynx has returned to Portugal after twenty years as part of the captive breeding programme. Watch video and report in Portuguese here with interview (in Spanish) with iberianatureforummer Iñigo Sanchez of Jerez Zoo, from where the female lynx, Azahar, was taken.

Lynx to return to Portugal after 20 years

October 24th, 2009

Twenty years after becoming extinct in Portugal, the Iberian lynx is to return to the country next week as part of the reintroduction programme. A female will be transferred to the new breeding centre in the village of Silves in Portugal. A total of 16 animals are to moved to the centre in the coming weeks. These animals will be used for captive breeding rather than for releases.

The first releases in the wild in Spain are now set for 2010 when 8-10 lynxes are to be released in Guadalmellato (Córdoba) and Guarrizas (Jaén). From 2011, between 20 and 40 individuals will be released a year. Público

Photo above from ex situ Iberian lynx conservation programme. Here

Iberian lynxes for Portugal

June 7th, 2009

The Spanish government has agreed to “cede” (what a horrible word!) several lynxes to Portugal as part of the reintroduction programme. More, no doubt, on this soon.
EuropaPressAnd also in the areas earmarked for lynx reintroduction (Hornachuelos and Guadalmellato (Córdoba) and Guarrizas) Jaen), a questionnaire has found 68% of persons believe that the presence of the lynx in their counties will boost tourism.
Diario de Córdoba

Last imperial eagle shot in Portugal

March 11th, 2009

Portuguese environmentalists have denounced the deliberate shooting of the country’s only nesting male Iberian Imperial eagle.The incident took place in February in the Vale do Guadiana natural park, close to the country’s southeastern border with Spain.

Miguel Rodrigues, spokesperson for SOS Lynx, said, “Irrational attitudes constitute one of the main barriers to predator conservation in Spain and Portugal. If predator persecution cannot be adequately controlled, the future recovery of many important predator species will be in doubt.” The species was once widespread across the Iberian Peninsula, but is now confined to small parts of central and southern Spain, and areas close to the Spanish border in Portugal.

Dan Ward on his new lynxblog comments on this shooting that:

“Irrational attitudes constitute one of the main barriers to predator conservation in Spain and Portugal, and if predator persecution cannot be adequately controlled, the future recovery of many important predator species will be in doubt”.

The Spanish (or Iberian) imperial eagle is one of the three rarest birds of prey in the world. Spain currently (2007) is home to all 234 pairs of imperial eagles, with a slight rise in recent years (see news archive on iberianature.

Spanish wind power record

December 4th, 2008

The record for electricity production from wind power was beaten again on 24th November at around 0500am when around 43% of power in Spain (9,253 MW) was covered. By the end of the year wind power will have covered 11% of Spain’s needs. Spain is the third-largest generator of wind power in the world, with about 16,000 MW of installed capacity with plans for 20,000 MW by 2010.
Juan López de Uralde in El Mundo

And on the topic of wind energy, the largest onshore wind farm in Europe started producing power yesterday today in northern Portugal. The farm is to provide enough electricity for up to a million people. A total of 120 windmills are dotted across the highlands of the Upper Minho region of Portugal which continues to forge its reputation as a renewables champion.
The Guardian

Pelamis wave machine in Portugal

September 27th, 2008

The Pelamis wave farm has just been officially launched after a delay of more than a year. Pelamis takes its name from an ancient word for sea snake, as the machines could be described as giant metal snakes floating in the water. At full production they will be able to generate enough power for 1,500 homes, with 25 more machines set to be installed in Portugal.

“In addition to this flagship wave power, the Portuguese are investing heavily in other renewable technologies. They are already spending £250m on more than 2,500 solar photovoltaic panels to build the world’s largest solar farm near the small town of Moura in eastern Portugal. It will have twice the collecting area of London’s Hyde Park and supply 45MW of electricity each year, enough to power 30,000 homes. In the past three years, the country has also trebled its hydroelectric capacity and quadrupled its wind power sources – northern Portugal has the world’s biggest wind farm with more than 130 turbines and a factory that builds the 40m-long blades. Pinho wants Portugal to rival Denmark or Japan in its commitment to developing renewables industries – he predicts his country will generate 31% of all its primary energy from clean sources by 2020, compared with Britain’s target of 15%. The Portuguese target means increasing the generation of electricity from renewable sources from 42% in 2005 to 60% in 2020.”

Iberian lynx breeding centre in Portugal

June 14th, 2008

Work has begun on the first Iberian lynx breeding centre in Portugal, in Silves in the Algarve. When completed, the centre will have room for 16 Iberian Lynxes (lince-ibérico in Portuguese, note the hyphen) , donated by the Acebeche breeding centre in Doñana. According to these news articles, Doñana now has six young lynx available for transfer. Público (Portugues) Portugal Resident (English)