lammergeyer

Articles in ‘lammergeyer’

Lammergeyer continues recovery in Aragón

May 5th, 2017

The lammergeyer or bearded vulture is continuing to recover in Aragón, its Iberian stronghold, with 90 pairs recorded in 2017, up from less than 40 in the 1980s. More here

Chicks from Aragón are to be taken to teh Picos de Europa to help in the reintroduction project there. Here

Lammergeyer eating a bone

March 30th, 2011


Nice, short video of a lammergeyer (bearded vulture – Gypaetus barbatus) swallowing a bone.  The images were  recorded in Tremp, in the Pyrenees at  “La Terret” observatory. Sent to me by recercaenaccio.cat.

Bearded vultures in Cazorla

May 26th, 2009

The programme to reintrodce the lammergeyer (bearded vulture) in the Sierra de Cazorla is continuing with the release last week of three more females. 12 birds have now been released through the technique of hacking in the range since 2006. Five chicks were also born in captivity in Cazorla this February.

El Mundo

Visit the lammergeyer breeding centre in Cazorla

May 23rd, 2008

    The Fundación Gypaetus is organising a series of guided to the lammergeyer breeding centre in Cazorla. The centre is home to 18 adult birds and one chick born in March. The visits are open between 15th May and 30th September. Tel. 953 720923 or read in La Fundación Gypaetus

    Conservation work camp in the Picos de Europa

    May 13th, 2008

    The Fundación para la Conservación del Quebrantahuesos is organising a work camp in July with volunteers in the village of Bejes, Cantabria. The camp is centred on helping the maintenance of traditional livestock farming in the Picos de Europa as an essential element in the conservation of the biodiversity and the recovery of the lammergeyer in the Cantabrian Mountains. Volunteers will help in sheering the sheep which are taken up to the high pastures in the summer. The camp involves three days working with the shepherds, two days learning about the fauna and flora of the Picos and one day’s rest. Knowledge of some Spanish is highly recommendable. More information from FCQ.

    Cazorla lammergeyer shot in Granada

    April 29th, 2008

    One of the lammergeyers released in the Sierra de Cazorla as part of the reintroduction programme has been found shot dead in the nearby Sierra de Castril (Granada). Its body was found thanks to the satellite tagging system fitted to all the released birds. The female was born at the lammergeyer breeding centre in Guadalentín (Jaén) where another 14 birds have been born. This is the first bearded vulture to be shot since the reintroduction programme began. The programme is to go ahead and three more birds are to be released in May. El País

    Vulture feeding stations in the Sierra de Guara

    April 4th, 2008

    Vulture feeding stations in the Sierra de Guara

    Interesting article here from birdguide.com about Vulture feeding stations in the Sierra de Guara.
    “The authorities have set up a number of feeding stations where carcases are provided especially for vultures. As a result, numbers of vultures, particularly Griffons, have increased rather than declined and birders are provided with wonderful viewing opportunities. In addition to substantial numbers of Griffon Vultures, it is possible to see Lammergeiers and, in summer, Egyptian Vultures at these sites….The biggest and most spectacular feeding site is at Alquezar.”

    Innovative breeding techniques for Lammergeier

    March 30th, 2008

    Lammergeier

    Using a technique for the first time with this species, the Foundation for the Reintroduction of the Lammergeier hope to release a bird bred completely isolated from human contact. They’ve built a 6x6m platform at 1,500m in Ordesa which includes a heated nest with a “puppet” adult bird to feed the chick and, next to it, a cage which the chick will be moved into after 80 days to continue the natural imprinting process as in this area of the Pyrenees there is the largest population of the species in Europe. A feeding station next to the cage will provide opportunity for the chick (born in Feb.) to observe and learn natural adult behaviour. After 120 days the young bird will fly for the first time.
    They say that this tecnique will be used in the “near future” for the release of three birds in the Picos de Europa, from which I guess will be next year, the only difference being that the birds will be relocated from the Pyrenees two weeks before their first flights in the Picos.

    The conservation group are already using another technique of strategically placing caged adult birds in areas in which they hope to encourage the Lammergeier to return.

    For more info go to the discussion on Iberianature forum

    Posted by Lisa

    Lammergeyer in Cazorla

    February 11th, 2008

    Good news for the Lammergeyer (quebrantahuesos. Less than two years after the release of the first individuals from the captive breeding programme of Cazorla y Segura where the bird became extinct in 1980s, the young birds have begun to disperse as far as the French Pyrenees and to areas such as Montes de Toledo, La Rioja, and Castilla y León.The first three individuals, released in May 2006, have flown 25,000 kilometres according to GPS system which is tacking them. However, all of the birds have returned home to Cazorla to breed. There are now 18 lammergeyers flying free in the Sierras de Cazorla y Segura, 12 of which were born in the breeding centre and the rest brought from Austria and the Czech Republic. More releases are planned to boost the population.

    Los 25.000 kilómetros del quebrantahuesos (El Pais)

    More on the bearded vulture on Iberianature

    Sheep and goats in the Picos de Europa

    November 25th, 2007

    Lisa has some great photos over at the forum of a sheep and goat show in Potes, Picos de Europa, organised by Fundation for the Conservation of the Lammergeyer. She notes “The FCQ hopes to re-introduce three Lammergeyer into the Picos next spring. SEO Asturias have their misgivings over the release, however, due to the still prevalent practice of poisoned bait being put down for other species. The more interaction and dialogue between everyone the better I think, if this practice is to be stamped out.” Below Picos goat breed. Read and see photos on the forum