chorizo

A guide to food in Spain

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chorizo

Spanish chorizo is made from coarsely chopped fatty pork (ie cheeks, salivary glands or lymph nodes) and usually seasoned with paprika and garlic, the former giving it its characteristic flavour. Chorizo can be picante (hot) or dulce (sweet), the latter with guindillas secas (small dried hot chiles). Chroizos are used extensively in Spanish popular cooking e.g. huevos con chorizo.

Chorizo by Francis Barrett

This spicy red sausage comes in so many sizes and varieties that an entire mouthwatering book could be written on the subject. Some are served whole; others are sliced either finely or coarsely. Some are best eaten cold, while others are perfect fried or boiled, and yet others are excellent in stews and bean dishes. Some are better than others, but almost all of them are delicious. Chorizo ibérico is very highly regarded. Traditionally, the best chorizo comes from La Rioja, even more famous for its wines. Dishes a la riojana invariably contain chorizo . My Argentinean flatmate Esteban likes cooking chorizos criollos, a spicy South American variety. Chorizo is also the name given to petty thieves, pickpockets and bag-snatchers.