Largest Bechstein’s Bat colony discovered

The largest colony of the endangered Bechstein’s Bat (Myotis bechsteini – murciélago ratonero forestal) in the Iberian Peninsula has been discovered in the Alta Garrotxa in Catalonia by Xavier Puig of the wildlife research group Galanthus, as part of a bat census together with the Museum of Granollers. The colony is formed by 24 individuals and is the first non-fossil citing for Catalonia. These bats, probably the rarest species in Europe, live in mature forests with old trees with plenty of nooks and crannies for shelter. They will also nest in cracks in rocks and even old buildings. They have a penchant for taking non-flying invertebrates (spiders, centipedes, caterpillars, etc) on the ground, or vegetation, swooping upon them with their slow, low-flying ponderous but agile flight, though they’ll also snap up insects from the air. Fossil evidence suggests that 5000 years ago Bechstein’s bat was one of the commonest species in Europe, thriving in the continent’s old mature woods, but the historic destruction of forests has led them to their current plight. Photo of Bechstein’s bat by Xavier Puig. See also Bats in Spain

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